It's only a passing thing, this shadow

Hi I'm Emily. This isn't my gif but I want Cory to be on here.

INFJ - 20 - Feminist - Socialist - Forever working on internalised prejudices and educating myself on important issues

Likes: pretty pictures of my favourite films and tv shows, hedgehogs, kickass women and pretty dresses.

~On a hiatus over summer~



spitefulbitch:

restructures:

shykomaeda:

myflameofhope:

shykomaeda:

how long must we wait for a lesbian disney princess

or what about a prince who throughout the entire movie you think he’s going to be the love interest but in the end it turns out he’s gay

or how about a lesbian princess

how about a princess whose sexuality doesn’t matter and that doesn’t focus or rely on a love interest????

or a lesbian princess


posted 8 hours ago | 223850 notes | via thisoneslate
tags: #every time

mars-wan-kenobi:

'I wanted to create a character who was so far down that her outlook was: “There's nothing anyone can do to me now. I've been through it all,”' Thomas says. 'I wanted a teenage girl who no longer got embarrassed or worried about what others said about her, or fretted over what she was going to wear.'

#QUEEN


posted 8 hours ago | 1600 notes | via mars-wan-kenobi | (© loganmars)
tags: #veronica mars

astrophobe:

aresnakesreal:

i hate monopoly it is like some old white guy was sitting around and then thought to himself, what if we could make capitalism fun? well you tried and you failed dipshit

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_board_game_Monopoly it was actually created by a Georgist to illustrate the principle that rent makes landlords richer and tenants poorer. She designed it to be incredibly not fun, to show that if you don’t own property you experience an inevitable foreseeable slow dwindling of your resources until you eventually go bankrupt. She figured that through Monopoly people would be so bored and frustrated that they would understand how terrible the system of rent is

Then Parker Brothers patented it, mass-produced it, people bought it because people have terrible taste in games, and the original creator experienced an inevitable foreseeable slow dwindling of her resources until she died impoverished and obscure



posted 8 hours ago | 3466 notes | via theedgeofnight | (© annakendrick)
tags: #community
MAR 11 Anthony Mackie at the ‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’ Press Conference at the Four Seasons Hotel

dreamadove:

flameraven:

andythanfiction:

liquid-pickle:

baw-bee:

sophieonpage:

thegoddamazon:

I present the most badass gifset on Tumblr.

Legitimately turned on by this

This is the best thing.

Oh my god

I don’t even know this fandom and this is cool.

Reason #999 why the cartoon will always be ONE MILLION PERCENT better than that travesty of a movie. They did so much research and put so much detail in you don’t even notice.

Bonus trivia: Toph got a unique martial arts style to match her distinct version of Earthbending (Southern Praying Mantis style, I think) which the creators found out later was (according to legend) invented by a blind woman. Totally a coincidence, but still so *** cool.

(If you don’t watch the show, Toph is both blind from birth and the best *** Earthbender in the world. Also, GO WATCH THE SHOW.)

THIS SHOW WAS AMAZING. I DID NOT WATCH IT FOR A LONG TIME BUT WHEN I DID I WAS COMPLETELY BLOWN AWAY. ART. IT WAS ART.


dead-end-street:

The first and last time Mako Mori sees Stacker Pentecost. Both times she has tears running down her cheeks, but the emotions are very different.


"

I think the reason that lots of people think Steven Moffat’s version of Doctor Who is sexist is because it repeatedly acts and sounds sexist. It may be that Moffat consciously tries to craft his Who as feminist or pro-feminist. If so, I don’t think there’s any better illustration of the crucial point that, in a sexist society, however much of an ‘ally’ you may be, if you’re a man then you still enjoy male privilege, and probably don’t realise it half the time.

The Doctor describes Clara as “a mystery wrapped in an enigma squeezed into a skirt that’s just a little bit too tight”. The Doctor describes Marilyn Monroe as though she really was nothing more than the stereotypical ‘man crazy’ ditz she played in some of her movies. Rory likens being married to Amy to being trapped inside a giant robot duplicate of her. We get dialogue like “Why did she try to kill you and then want to marry you?” “Because she’s a woman”. Osgood, a scientist, is shown to be secretly obsessed with jealousy towards her prettier sister. A Dalek develops a female alter-ego, and she spends her time cooking.
[…]
In Moffat’s show, women are overwhelmingly defined by their traditional gender roles or bodily functions. It doesn’t matter that their excellence in these gender roles is praised by show and lead character. It doesn’t matter that we’re supposed to be impressed by the virtuosity with which River tricks people using her feminine wiles. It doesn’t change anything that the Doctor goes into rhapsodies about the wonders of motherhood. That isn’t liberating; it’s still the mapping of male, patriarchal conceptions of female value onto female characters.

River exists entirely because of the Doctor. Who the hell is River? She is an assemblage of gender essentialist tropes and wisecracks. When does she ever – beyond, arguably, her first appearance – behave like an academic or a scientist? When does she ever display anything resembling erudition or intellectual curiosity? When does she ever do or say anything to show or engender love? Admittedly, the Doctor seems to be sexually aroused by the way she shoots people… which is just charming. In ‘Let’s Kill Hitler’, she is incarnated as Mels, a character we’ve never seen or heard of before, and plonked unceremoniously into the story out of sheer, brazen convenience. She stalks Amy and Rory (her unwitting mother and father) for years, pretending to be their friend, all because of her pre-programmed monomaniacal desire to get to the Doctor. She regenerates while “concentrating on a dress size”. She spends the rest of the episode obsessing over her hair, clothes, shoes and weight. River’s instability is finally conquered by the love of a good man. This seems intensely hostile and patronising. If that isn’t what was aimed at, then somebody is a very bad shot.

It doesn’t matter that River is ‘powerful’. Fetishizing ‘power’ in women characters – having them kicking ass and always being ready with a putdown - isn’t the same as writing them as human beings.

"  -

Steven Moffat: a Case for the Prosecution

[…]The reason I feel ill when the Doctor snogs River’s ghost at the end of ‘Name of the Doctor’ is not that I hate emotion in Who, or that I want – because I’m a sexually and emotionally repressed nerd or something – Doctor Who to be emotionless.  Rather, the opposite of this is the truth.  The reason I feel ill at moments like that is rather that I hate fake emotion, cheap emotion, unearned emotion.  Commodified emotion.  Packaged, marketed, profitable, sugary, junk emotion.  Sentimentality, in other words. 

Sentimentality is disgusting because it’s not fundamentally about other people, or relationships.  It’s about oneself.  It’s self-regarding, self-comforting, self-pleasing.  It isn’t social.  It’s narcissistic.  This is precisely what is so horribly wrong with all those Moffatian emotional tornadoes.  How can they be touching when the characters and relationships are so shallow?  When we’re watching narcissists adoring their own reflections in their partner’s eyes?[…]
 I don’t like having to hate this show.  I want to love it.  

(via blake-wyatt)


coffeewithajla:

"Remember that in racist, demographics obsessed Israel, the most fearsome "existential threat" is the birth of a Palestinian child."


posted 6 days ago | 19378 notes | via amodernmanifesto | (© coffeewithajla)
tags: #israel #palestine